Author: Accounts

Super Guarantee Amnesty Update

The Government’s proposed Superannuation Guarantee (SG) Amnesty will not proceed. To recap, the SG amnesty was to be available for the 12-month period from 24 May 2018 to 23 May 2019. To get the benefits of the Amnesty (set out below) employers must have during this 12-month period voluntarily disclosed any SG underpayments that existed in the past (going as far back to when SG commenced in 1992). For an employer, the tax benefits of the amnesty were:

  *   The administration component of the SG Charge (SGG) would not be payable (this is a $20 per employee, per quarter, for whom there is an SG Shortfall)

  *   Part 7 penalties would not be applied. This can be up to 200% of the SG Charge that is payable (note that SG Charge includes the SG Shortfall that is owed to employees)

  *   All catch-up payments made during the 12-month amnesty period were to be tax deductible.

By contrast, under the current law, when SG has been underpaid or paid late, the SG Charge that must paid to the ATO is not deductible, and late contributions that an employer has made to an employee’s superannuation fund and has elected to offset against their SG Charge liability are also not deductible.

With Parliament having been prorogued for the Federal Election, the legislation to enact the Amnesty (which is opposed by the Labor Party) will not pass into law. Therefore, employers who disclosed SG shortfalls during the Amnesty period will be subject to the current law and not enjoy the Amnesty concessions, irrespective of any assurances offered by ATO employees at the time employers made disclosures. The ATO have however indicated that it will exercise its discretion and not apply Part 7 penalties to these employers. The Part 7 penalties aspect of the SG Charge regime did not require a change to legislation as the discretion to waive penalties already sits with the ATO.Going forward, with super funds now reporting to the ATO more regularly (at least once per month), we would strongly urge all employers to pay SG on time and in full by the quarterly cut-off dates

Update – Instant Asset Write-off Changes now Legislated

In the Budget on Tuesday, the Government announced that it would increase the instant asset write-off threshold to $30,000 and extend it to medium sized businesses (those with an aggregated annual turnover of less than $50 million).

This, and the earlier change announced in January (to extend the write-off threshold to $25,000) passed both Houses of Parliament yesterday and is now law (subject to the formality of Royal Assent).

The amendments mean there will be three tiers in the 2018/2019 financial year:

1.     $20,000 threshold for depreciable assets that are acquired and installed ready for use before 29 January 2019. Only available for businesses with an aggregated turnover less than $10 million.

2.     $25,000 threshold for assets first used or installed between 29 January 2019 and 2 April 2019. Only available for businesses with an aggregated turnover less than $10 million.

3.     $30,000 threshold for assets first used and installed after the 2 April budget announcement and before 1 July 2020. Available for businesses with a turnover of less than $50 million.

Going forward, all businesses with a turnover under $50 million are now eligible for a write-off of $30,000. This will be available under 30 June 2020.

To get the taxation benefit of this in the current financial year, you will need to have the asset installed ready for use on or before 30 June 2019.

2019 Federal Budget Wrap

Following is a brief summary of some of the headline Budget measures.

BUSINESS

*         Instant Asset Write-Off Boosted and Expanded – Two key changes have been made:

o    The write-off has been extended to medium-sized businesses (those with an aggregated annual turnover of less than $50 million.

o    The threshold has been increased to $30,000.

Therefore, subject to legislation, businesses with an aggregated turnover of less than $50 million will be able to immediately deduct purchases of eligible assets costing less than $30,000 that are purchased and then first used, or installed ready for use, from Budget night (2 April 2019) to 30 June 2020.

*         Division 7A Changes Deferred – The Government’s proposed Division 7A changes will be deferred by 12 months to 1 July 2020. To recap, Division 7A is designed to prevent profits or assets being provided to shareholders or their associates tax-free. You can read more about these proposed changes – which are not yet even in draft legislative form – on the ATO website.<//www.ato.gov.au/General/New-legislation/In-detail/Other-topics/Targeted-amendments-to-Division-7A/>

*         Crackdown on Unpaid Tax and Super by Larger Businesses – The Government will provide more than $40 million to the ATO to recover unpaid tax and Superannuation Guarantee owed by larger businesses.

*         Strengthening ABN Rules – This measure imposes new compliance obligations on ABN holders to retain their ABN. From 1 July 2021, ABN holders with an income tax return obligation will be required to lodge their income tax return and from 1 July 2022 confirm the accuracy of their details on the Australian Business Register annually.

*         Tackling Sham Contracting – The Government will provide more than $9 million to establish a dedicated unit within the Fair Work Ombudsman to address sham contracting. This is where employers seek to avoid statutory obligations and employment entitlements (such as paid leave and superannuation) by misrepresenting employer/employee relationships as independent contracts.

PERSONAL TAX CHANGES

*         Income Tax Cuts by Increasing Tax Offset – Subject to the passage of legislation, tax relief will be granted to individuals via the non-refundable low and middle income tax offset (LMITO). The LIMTO will increase from a current maximum of $530 per year to $1,080. Further, the base rate will increase from $200 to $255 per year for 2018/2019 through to 2021/2022. Depending on your level of income, the changes will benefit individuals as follows:

o    The LMITO will now provide a reduction in tax of up to $255 for taxpayers with a taxable income of $37,000 or less.

o    Between taxable incomes of $37,000 and $48,000, the value of the offset will increase at a rate of 7.5 cents per dollar to the maximum offset of $1,080.

o    Taxpayers with taxable incomes between $48,000 and $90,000 will be eligible for the maximum offset of $1,080.

o    For taxable incomes of $90,000 to $126,000 the offset will phase out at a rate of 3 cents per dollar.

The LMITO will be enjoyed straight after individuals lodge their income tax returns for the above years.

*         Income Tax Cuts via Rate and Threshold Changes – The following changes are slated for future income years:

o    From 1 July 2022, an increase to the top threshold of the 19% personal income tax bracket from$41,000 to $45,000.

o    From 1 July 2022, an increase in the low income tax offset (LITO) from $645to $700.

*         New Deductible Gift Recipients (DGRs) Approved – The following organisations have been granted DGR status from 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2024: Australian Academy of Law, China Matters Limited, Foundation Broken Hill Limited, Motherless Daughters Australia Limited, Superannuation Consumers Centre Limited, and The Headstone Project (Tasmania) Incorporated. The Government will also establish a deductible gift recipient (DGR) general category to enable Men’s Sheds and Women’s Sheds to access DGR status from 1 July 2020.

SUPERANNUATION CHANGES

  *   Removal of Work Test for Certain Taxpayers – The current superannuation work test will be removed for people aged 65 and 66 from 1 July 2020.

  *   Extending Eligibility for the Bring-Forward Cap – From 1 July 2020, access to the bring-forward cap will be extended from taxpayers aged less than 65 years of age to those aged 65 and 66.

  *   Increase to Age Limit for Spouse Contributions – The age limit for spouse contributions will increase from 69 to 75 from 1 July 2020.

90% Error Rate in Rental Property Claims

The ATO Commissioner, Mr Chris Jordan, earlier this year stated that following ATO efforts, for the first time in almost 25 years, the average work-related claim decreased over the past 2 years.

The Commissioner said the ATO’s next focus is rental income and deductions. To this end, as part of the ATO’s broader random enquiry program, ATO auditors have now completed over 300 audits on rental property claims and “found errors in almost 9 out of 10 tax returns reviewed”. He said the most common errors the ATO is seeing are:

1.     incorrect interest claims for the entire investment loan where it has been refinanced for private purposes

2.     incorrect classification of capital works as repairs and maintenance, and

3.     taxpayers not apportioning deductions for holiday homes when they are not genuinely available for rent.

Regarding the first category of incorrect claims, interest can still be claimed where a loan has been refinanced. However, the borrowed funds must still be used for a deductible purpose (i.e. in relation to the rental property). Where the refinanced amount is used for a non-deductible purposes (for example, to buy a boat or car, or to make repayments towards the family home), the interest that relates to that portion of the refinanced amount will no longer be deductible.

In respect of repairs and maintenance, in a rental property context, repairs generally involve a replacement or renewal of a worn out or broken part, for example, replacing worn or damaged curtains, blinds or carpets. Maintenance generally involves keeping the property in a tenantable condition, for example repainting faded or damaged interior walls. By contrast examples of capital expenditure include:

*         replacing an entire structure or unit of the property (e.g. an entire fence, kitchen cupboards, stove etc.)

*         improvements, renovations, extensions

*         initial repairs to defects that existed when you first purchased the property.

These types of capital expenses are not immediately deductible, but rather must be claimed over a number of years.

The finally category of mistakes, involves claiming a deduction for expenditure relating to the property, even though it is not being rented out, or it is not genuinely available for rent. During these periods, expenses cannot be claimed. To be clear, expenses may be deductible for periods when the property has no tenants and you are not occupying it, providing it is genuinely available for rent. To evidence this, you would need to show that it is being given broad exposure to potential tenants, such as online or newspapers advertisements etc.

Interest Rates on Hold

Last week (05/03/19), the Reserve Bank of Australia decided not to change the official cash rate of 1.5%. Two days later the December quarter economic growth figures showed that the economy had slowed considerably – growing by just 0.2% from October to December, and 2.3% over the previous 12 months. This is considerably less than the forecast 3% in the Federal Budget. As a result, many economists are now expecting the Reserve Bank to reduce interest rates even further in the coming year; which would represent record lows. It’s an opportune time therefore to review whether you are making the most of this low rate environment. 

Have you considered the following? 

*         Fixed rate options. While rates are at an all-time low there may be opportunities to fix your loans for 3 or 5 years at under 5% per annum. Explore your options. Some borrowers may wish to fix just a portion of their loan. 

*         Review your position. Low interest rates offer an opportunity to refinance or revise your payment schedule to pay your loan off sooner. Talk to your broker to see if there’s a home or business loan that better suits your needs. 

*         Debt reduction. With lower rates, your monthly/fortnightly repayments will be less. Rather than pocketing the difference, if you put the difference into extra repayments, you can shave years off your loan and, in doing so, save thousands in interest. For example, a $500,000 home loan at an interest rate of 7% requires repayments of $3,078 per month over 30 years. At 4.5%, the repayments are $2,533, a difference of $545 a month. If you put that $545 into extra repayments, you can potentially take more than 9 years off the home loan term and save almost $140,000 in interest. 

*         Create an offset account. This is effectively a money source sitting beside your mortgage. Any savings inside this account are effectively offset against your loan, which in turn reduces the amount of interest you pay. 

Of course, low rates will not be around forever. As a borrower it’s important not to become complacent and to make sure that you still have the capacity to meet your repayment obligations in the event that rates increase. 

Legislation Update 26/02/2019

The first sitting of Parliament for 2019 wrapped up last week. While legislation to extend the Single Touch Payroll reporting regime to all employers passed into law (just awaiting Royal Assent), there are a couple of other measures that remain unlegislated which could impact your business. With the full Parliament only expected to sit for three more days (April 2 – 4) until an Election is called, there are now serious doubts surrounding whether these measures will pass into law. In view of this, we put forward the following suggested approach in the meantime: 

  1. Superannuation Amnesty 

The legislation to enact this measure is still before the Senate. To recap, the Superannuation Guarantee Amnesty was to be available for the 12-month period from 24 May 2018 to 23 May 2019. To get the benefits of the Amnesty (set out below) employers must during this 12-month period voluntarily disclose any Superannuation Guarantee underpayments that exist in the past (going back to when Superannuation Guarantee commenced in 1992). 

For an employer, the tax benefits of the Amnesty are: 

* The administration component of the Superannuation Guarantee Charge (SGG) is not payable (this is a $20 per employee, per quarter, for whom there is an SG Shortfall) 

*  Part 7 penalties will not be applied. This can be up to 200% of the SG Charge that is payable (note that SG Charge includes the SG Shortfall that you owe to employees) 

* All catch-up payments that you make during the 12-month Amnesty period will be tax deductible. 

By contrast, under the current law, when superannuation has been underpaid or paid late Superannuation Guarantee Charge that must paid to the ATO is not deductible, and late contributions that an employer has made to an employee’s superannuation and has elected to offset against their SG Charge liability are also not deductible. 

If an employer is contemplating disclosing past superannuation shortfalls specifically to get the benefits of the Amnesty (including claiming a deduction for your late contributions) then it may be prudent to hold off until such time that the Amnesty actually becomes law (if at all). We will keep you apprised of the passage of the legislation through Parliament. However, with only a few sitting days remaining for this Parliament, and with the Opposition opposed to this measure, there are serious doubts about it becoming law. 

Irrespective of the Amnesty however, all employers should consider coming forward to disclose and pay past shortfalls to get their Superannuation Guarantee affairs in order. The Government is committing more resources to this area – including requiring Superannuation Funds to report more regularly to the ATO (at least once each month) – therefore non-complying employers may be more easily detected going forward. 

  1. Enhancing the Instant Asset Write-Off 

Legislation to expand and extend the Small Business Instant Asset Write-Off is still before the House of Representatives. This Bill seeks to extend the write-off by 12 months until 30 June 2020 (currently set to expire on 30 June 2019) and increase the threshold by $5,000 to $25,000; with the increase backdated to 29 January 2019. If passed into law, this would mean that there would be two thresholds for 2018/2019 as follows: 

* $20,000 (for assets installed ready for use between 1 July 2018 and 28 January 2019), and 

* $25,000 (for assets installed ready for use between 29 January 2019 and 30 June 2019. 

Irrespective of the whether the legislation passes into law, it is important to have perspective. You are only getting back the tax rate on the asset, not the full value of the asset. This is the same as the old law where the write-off threshold was $1,000  You don’t get any extra cash than you would otherwise have received under the old rules – you simply get it sooner. Consequently, you should not let tax distort or blur your commercial instincts – as you don’t get any extra cash than you would otherwise have under the old rules, you should continue to only buy assets that fit within your business plan. 

Key Dates For March & April

Many lodgement and payment dealines are looming for business including those relating to Activity Statements, Superannuation, and more….  

MARCH 2019 
21 March – February monthly Activity Statements – due for lodgement and payment

APRIL 2019 
21 April – March monthly Activity Statements – due for lodgement and payment 
21 April – Quarter 3 (January-March) PAYG instalment Activity Statements for head companies of consolidated groups – due for lodgement and payment 
28 April – Quarter 3 (January-March) Activity Statements – due for lodgement and payment (if lodging by paper) 
28 April – Quarter 3 (January-March) PAYG instalment notices (forms R and T) – final date for payment and, if varying the instalment amound, lodgement 
28 April – Quarter 3 (January-March) GST instalment notices (forms S and T) – final date for payment and, if varying the instalment amount, lodgement 
28 April – Quarter 3 (January-March) superannuation guarantee contributions to be made to a complying fund on behalf of your employees 
30 April – Quarter 3 (January-March) TFN Report for closely held trusts for TFNs quoted to a trustee by beneficiaries – final date for lodgement 

Where one of these dates falls on a weekend or a public holiday, the due date is extended to the next business day.

The Tax Advantages of Superannuation

Superannuation is a concessionally taxed environment as follows  

* Superannuation earnings (such as interest, dividends, rent etc.) are taxed at 15% when your account is in accumulation mode (i.e. not in pension mode). These earnings are tax-free when your account is in pension mode. By contrast, investment earnings on assets (such as shares, property, term deposits etc.) held outside of superannuation are taxed at your marginal tax

* Capital gains made by superannuation funds are likewise taxed at 15% when your account is in accumulation mode. Where a CGT assets supports a pension, any capital gain made when those assets are sold is tax-free. Any capital gain made by your superannuation fund is reduced to 10% (a 33% discount) where that asset has been held for 12 months or more.  Although this is a lesser discount than the 50% discount available to trusts and individuals, this is negated by the base CGT superannuation taxation rate of 15%.

Therefore, as well as making provision for your retirement, by contributing to superannuation you can also enjoy the above tax concessions. From 1 July 2017 all individuals up to age 75 can claim an income tax deduction for personal superannuation contributions. Before this date, you could only claim a deduction for your personal contributions where less than 10% of your assessable income, your reportable fringe benefits and your reportable employer superannuation contributions (e.g. salary sacrifice contributions) for the year were from being an employee – this was known as the 10% Rule. This rule prevented most employees from claiming a tax deduction for this type of contribution. However, under the new rules, to claim a deduction, the following requirements must be met:

* Age – All individuals under the age of 65 are eligible. Those aged 65 to 74 meet the superannuation ‘work test’ (work for at least 40 hours in a period of not more than 30 consecutive days in the financial year in which you plan to make the contribution). For those aged 75, the contribution must be made no later than 28 days after the end of the month in which you turn 75. Older taxpayers are ineligible.

* Minors –  If the individual is under 18 at the end of the income year in which the contribution is made, they must derive income in that year from being an employee or carrying on a business.

* Complying Fund – The contribution must be made to a complying superannuation fund.

* Notice Requirements – To claim the deduction you must provide your superannuation fund with a Notice of intention to claim a deduction form before you lodge your tax return in respect of that financial year.

Superannuation is also a great asset protection strategy. If a person becomes bankrupt, they may lose most (or all) of their assets. However, the Bankruptcy Act provides that the interest of the bankrupt in a regulated superannuation fund at the time of the commencement of the bankruptcy is not ‘property’ that can vest in their trustee in bankruptcy to be divided among creditors. Furthermore, if the superannuation fund pays a lump sum to a bankrupt (though not a pension) after the date of the bankruptcy, this money is also not divisible among creditors.

 

#News Flash# Single Touch Payroll Legislation Passes Parliament

Smaller employers (those with 19 or less employees) must commence reporting via Single Touch Payroll (STP) from 1 July 2019 after legislation passed Parliament this morning (12/02/2019).  

The STP regime revolutionises the way employers report payroll information to the ATO. In essence, STP is a new reporting mechanism whereby employers report employee payments (such as salary and wages, allowances etc.) and PAYG withholding to the ATO directly through their STP solution (e.g. upgraded Standard Business Reporting-enabled software) at the same time they pay their employees. To be clear, no additional reporting is required – just a new method of reporting.

Standard business reporting-enabled software (SBR-enabled software) is essential to reporting under STP. Employers must adopt an STP solution by the due date. Solutions will vary depending on an employer’s current payroll processes.

  •  Accountant or Bookkeeper – Employers who use an Accountant or Bookkeeper to process their pays will simply rely on them to provide an STP solution (SBR-enabled software) by the deadline. Even where an Accountant or Bookkeeper does not process employer payroll, employers may turn to them for advice around how they can become STP-compliant.
  • Software Upgrades – If an employer uses commercial payroll software, then they should contact their software provider as the deadline nears and ensure that they offer an updated Standard Business Reporting-enabled version of the software. Major software houses have this software available.
  • In-House Method – If an employer uses an in-house method of payroll or manual method (such as paying employees by EFT and manually providing them with pay-slips and Payment Summaries)…then they will likely need to adopt STP-compliant payroll software. Such employers may lean heavily on their Bookkeeper or Accountant when installing this software, and may need upfront training. Alternatively, they may choose to outsource their payroll to a payroll service provider such as a payroll bureau, or an Accountant or Bookkeeper.

The ATO is acknowledging that there are a significant number of smaller employers who do not use any type of payroll software when processing the pays each week/fortnight etc. Consequently, micro businesses (employers with 1 to 4 employees) will not be required to adopt/buy payroll software in order to comply with Single Touch Payroll (STP) reporting. Whilst for most employers their STP solution will be adopting STP-compliant software, micro-businesses will according to the ATO be provided with different STP compliance options. Speaking on a recent ATO webcast, ATO Assistant Commissioner, John Shepherd confirmed this:

“You won’t need to buy payroll software, that’s why we’re looking for those alternate solutions- some of which might be an app, something that’s fit for purpose to get the STP information in but is easy to use, doesn’t take much time and doesn’t cost that business money to do so ,” said Mr Shepherd.

“We’ve spoken to some different banks and the possibilities around as people pay staff through internet banking being able to submit the single touch pay run information at the same time and we expect that to be part of the list of options that come forward over the next 12 months.

“There are obviously lots of other benefits from using payroll software but we’re not saying for STP that you need to go out and buy a product to do STP.”

MYOB and Xero and other major software houses have already developed these low cost STP-solutions for micro-business. You should contact your Accountant or Bookkeeper for further guidance in this area.

 

 

Key Dates for January & February 2019

Many lodgement and payment deadlines are looming for business including those relating to Activity Statements, Superannuation, and more…..

January 2019
15 January – Due date for lodgement of income tax returns for companies and trust that were taxable medium to large businesses in the prior year and are not required to lodge earlier. If you fail to lodge by the due date, your 2018/2019 income tax return will be due on 31 October 2019
21 January – Due date for lodgement and payment of December 2018 monthly Activity Statements
28 January – Due date for October-December 2018 Superannuation Guarantee contributions to be made to a complying fund on behalf of your employees
31 January – Final date for lodgement of October-December 2018 TFN report for closely held trust for TFNs quoted to a trustee by beneficiaries

February 2019
21 February – Due date for lodgement and payment of January monthly Activity Statements
28 February – Due date for lodgement and payment of October-December 2018 quarterly Activity Statements, including electronic lodgments
28 February – Due date for lodgement and payment of Annual GST returns or Annual GST information reports – if you do not have an income tax return lodgment obligation
28 February – Due date for lodgement and payment of income tax return for selp-preparing entities that were not due at an earlier date. If you fail to lodge by this date, your 2018/2019 return will be due by 31 October 2019
28 February – Due date for lodgement and payment of income tax returns for medium to large businesses (taxable and non-taxable that are new registrants)
28 February – Due date for lodgement and payment Superannuation Guarantee Charge Statement if you failed to pay Superannuation Guarantee charge on time for the October-December 2018 quarter. Superannuation Guarantee Charge is not deductible.

Where one of these dates falls on a weekend or a public holiday, the due date is extended to the next business day except in the case of Superannuation Guarantee contributions.