Category: Featured Articles

Office Closure Dates

Our office will be closed from 2pm 19th December 2018 and will reopen again at 8am 10 January 2019.  
Please feel free to email us and we will get back to you in the new year as soon as we can.  

Wishing all a Merry Christmas & a Happy, Safe New Year!

 

Key Dates for January & February 2019

Many lodgement and payment deadlines are looming for business including those relating to Activity Statements, Superannuation, and more…..

January 2019
15 January – Due date for lodgement of income tax returns for companies and trust that were taxable medium to large businesses in the prior year and are not required to lodge earlier. If you fail to lodge by the due date, your 2018/2019 income tax return will be due on 31 October 2019
21 January – Due date for lodgement and payment of December 2018 monthly Activity Statements
28 January – Due date for October-December 2018 Superannuation Guarantee contributions to be made to a complying fund on behalf of your employees
31 January – Final date for lodgement of October-December 2018 TFN report for closely held trust for TFNs quoted to a trustee by beneficiaries

February 2019
21 February – Due date for lodgement and payment of January monthly Activity Statements
28 February – Due date for lodgement and payment of October-December 2018 quarterly Activity Statements, including electronic lodgments
28 February – Due date for lodgement and payment of Annual GST returns or Annual GST information reports – if you do not have an income tax return lodgment obligation
28 February – Due date for lodgement and payment of income tax return for selp-preparing entities that were not due at an earlier date. If you fail to lodge by this date, your 2018/2019 return will be due by 31 October 2019
28 February – Due date for lodgement and payment of income tax returns for medium to large businesses (taxable and non-taxable that are new registrants)
28 February – Due date for lodgement and payment Superannuation Guarantee Charge Statement if you failed to pay Superannuation Guarantee charge on time for the October-December 2018 quarter. Superannuation Guarantee Charge is not deductible.

Where one of these dates falls on a weekend or a public holiday, the due date is extended to the next business day except in the case of Superannuation Guarantee contributions.

STP Rollout Now Law!

The Senate has now passed legislation to extend Single Touch Payroll (STP) to employers with 19 or less employees from 1 July 2019.

These businesses can also of course opt in early to STP.

The passage of legislation follows months of uncertainty for small business after STP was officially rolled out for employers with 20 or more employees from 1 July 2018.

The ATO still intends to allow micro-businesses (less than 5 employees) to adopt low-cost, alternative STP solutions.

 

 

INSTANT ASSET WRITE-OFF EXTENDED

The extension of the $20,000 instant asset Write-Off has now been passsed into law. 

PASSED
In the May 2018 Federal Budget the Government announced an extension to the Small Business Instant Asset Write-Off that was originally introduced from 1 July 2015. Under the Budget announcement, the Write -Off was to be extended until 30 June 2019 (it was to expire 30 June 2018). On 12 September 2018, The Treasury Laws Amendment (Accelerated Depreciation for Small Business Entities) Bill 2018 was passed by the Parliament into law to give effect to this 12-month extension.


More info? In our exclusive Members Area, watch the Webinar on Instant Asset Write-off (under the useful links tab) and read the full article in your November/December 2018 Bi-Monthly Newsletter, page 15.

NOT a member? Join today for exclusive access to articles, webinars, videos & publications on Saving Tax!
Call today on 1800savetax (1800 728 3829) for a special offer for first time subscribers.
https://mytaxsavers.com.au/what-do-i-get/

SUPER AMNESTY – TAKE ADVANTAGE!

Could you as an employer benefit from taking advantage of the Government’s new Superannuation Guarantee (SG) Amnesty? This article informs you of how you can wipe your SG slate clean, and enjoy some once-off taxation benefits in doing so.

Subject to the passage of legislation (which is currently before the Senate), the Amnesty will be available for the 12-month period from 24 May 2018 to 23 May 2019.

BACKGROUND
The latest data indicates that the “SG Gap” or SG Shortfall (the difference between the theoretical amount payable by employers to be fully compliant with their SG obligations and the amount they have actually paid) is $2.85 billion annually. This indicates that a concerning number of employers are not paying sufficient SG to their employees or are not paying it at all. In response to this and in order to recoup this key employee entitlement, the Government in late May 2018, announced a once-off, 12-month Superannuation Amnesty for employers.
BENEFITS
For an employer, the benefits of the Amnesty are:
  • The administration component of the Superannuation Guarantee Charge (SGC) is waived (this is currently a $20 per employee, per quarter charge for whom there is an SG Shortfall)
  • Part 7 penalties will not be applied. This can be up to 200% of the SG Charge that is payable (note that SG Charge includes the SG Shortfall amount that you owe to employees)
  • All catch-up payments that you make during the 12-month Amnesty period will be tax deductible. The amendments also allow contributions that an employer has elected to offset against SG Charge imposed on the SG Shortfall disclosed in accordance with the Amnesty to be deducted from an employer’s assessable income. This ensures commensurate benefits are provided for employers who contribute directly to their employees’ funds when disclosing under the Amnesty as opposed to the benefits for those who instead make payments in relation to SG Charge and leave it to the ATO to distribute the amounts to the relevant funds.
By contrast, under the current law, SG Charge paid to the ATO is not deductible, and late contributions that an employer has made to an employees’ superannuation fund and has elected to offset against their SG Charge liability are also not deductible.
DETAILS
With a Bill to enact the new Amnesty now having been introduced to Parliament, we can reveal the details are as follows:
  • The Amnesty applies to any SG Shortfall from the introduction of SG back on 1 July 1992 to the quarter ending 31 March 2018.
  • You must voluntarily disclose amounts of SG Shortfall relating to the above period. Therefore, if an employer has already lodged an SG Charge Statement (and in that Statment disclosed particular SG Shortfalls), then those particular Shortfalls are not eligible for the Amnesty even if the amount of the Shortfall has yet to be paid. Likewise, Shortfalls that the ATO uncovers during current, future, or past audits of the employer are not eligible for the Amnesty. The disclosure of a new Shortfall must come from the employer, and must occur during the 12-month Amnesty period. By way of background, SG Charge Statements and SG Shortfalls operate under a self-assessment model. The ATO are in most cases unaware that an SG Shorfall exists except in the case where an employee lodges a complaint against their employer themselves, or the Shortfall is uncovered in an ATO audit. This lack of awareness by the ATO of past employer Shortfalls is why eligibility for the Amnesty rests on the disclosure by the employer of new, undisclosed Shortfalls.
  • There is no requirement to actually make a payment to get the benefit of the Amnesty. Rather, you only need to disclose an SG Shortfall. However, where you fail to make a payment during the Amnesty period, you will not receive a deduction for the catch-up payments (which are only available during the Amnesty).
  • Any payments made outside the Amnesty period are not eligible for a deduction. For example, if an employer discloses a Shortfall during the Amnesty period, and then makes a payment arrangement with the ATO to pay the required amounts back in instalments, any amounts paid after 23 May 2019 cannot be claimed as a deduction.
ACCESS
To access the Amnesty, employers or thier Advisors must first calculate the amount payable (the SG Shortfall, plus nominal interest) and lodge one of the following forms:
  • SG Amnesty Fund payment form (where you wish to access the Amnesty and can pay the amount in full (including nominal interest) direct to an employee’s superannuation fund)
  • SG Amnesty ATO payment form (where you wish to access the Amnesty but cannot pay the amount owing in full). If an employer has already lodged an SGC Statment or received an SGC assessment for a quarter, they can only use this form.
Employers need to lodge these completed forms electonically through the Business Portal or their Accountant or Bookkeeper on their behalf via the BAS Agent or Tax Agent Portal respectively. There is now a radio button on all portals. Information that must be provided includes:
  1. Details of Employer
  2. Number of quarters covered
  3. Number of employees, (no employee details are required)
  4. Amount to be paid.
CONCLUSION
Legislation to enact this Amnesty was introduced into Parliment in late May and has been passed by the House of Representatives. It is currently before the Senate. Interestingly, the Opposition have criticised the legislation which it says shows leniency to non-complying employers. Therefore, it is no absolute certainty that the Amnesty will be passed into law over the coming months. For this reason, if you are contemplating disclosing past shortfalls specifically to get the benefits of the Amnesty (including claiming a deduction for their late contributions) then it may be prudent to hold off until such time the Amnesty actually becomes law. We will keep you apprised of the passage of the legislation through Parliament.

Irrespective of the Amnesty however, all employers should strongly consider coming forward to disclose and pay past shortfalls to get their Superannuation Guarantee affairs in order. The Government is committing more resources to this area – including requiring Superannuation Funds to report more regularly to the ATO (at least once each month) – meaning non-complying employers may be easily detected going forward.

For more on this subject: Members – login to the members area, Useful Links tab – watch the Tackling Tax video ‘Superannuation Amnesty’ presented by our CEO Kelvin Deer. https://mytaxsavers.com.au/

Drought Assistance

With large swathes of Eastern Australia in the midst of one of the most severe droughts in years (indeed Autumn rainfall was the least since 1902). Be mindful that there are a number of assistance measures open to affected clients across a range of Government departments. On the ATO front, they can help by giving affected taxpayers more time to pay, waiving penalties or interest charged at a time a client was affected by drought, offering payment plans with interest free periods, and adjusting PAYG instalments to better suit the circustances. Furthermore, in special circumstances the ATO can release clients from paying some taxes, if the paying of those taxes would cause serious financial hardship.

PAYGW TAX VARIATION

We have all heard about businesses varying their PAYG instalments on their Activity Statement if their business and investment income for the current year is expected to be less than anticitpated. However, the opportunity also exists for salary and wage earners to vary downwards the amount of PAYG tax deducted by their employer each pay cycle. The main purpose of varying the rate or amount of PAYG withholding is to ensure that the amounts withheld during the income year better align with your year-end tax liability if you are a taxpayer who has significant deductible expenses throughout the year which may be the case for:  

  • Property owners who are hightly negatively geared; and
  • Taxpayers, such as salespeople, who have large travel expenses and other costs. 
By having less PAYG deducted, you are improving your cash flow. Rather than having to wait until year end to receive a sizeable tax refund, the refund is effectively flowing through to you in each pay cycle. You then have control over this money earlier than you otherwise would and can use it to invest or discharge your everyday expenses etc. If you think you may fall into this category of having large deductible expenses, then you should complete a PAYG withholding variation form which is availbale on the ATO website. http://www.ato.gove.au or consult your tax advisor. 

WARNING 
Before employing this strategy, be aware if the deductions you anticiapated having during the year do not materialise, or indeed, your untaxed income (such as rent, interest, dividends etc.) is higher than you anticipated for the year, you may end up with a tax bill when you lodge your return. 

Key Dates for November & December 2018

NOVEMBER 2018 
11 NOVEMBER – July-September quarterly Activity Statements – due for lodgement and payment. (if lodging electronically)
21 NOVEMBER – October monthly Activity Statements – due for lodgement and payment. 
28 NOVEMBER – Superannuation Guarantee Charge (SGC) Statement – due for lodgement and payment if insufficient contributions or late contributions were made for the July-September quarter.

DECEMBER 2018 
01 DECEMBER – Due date for income tax payments for companies that were required to lodge by 31 October.
21 DECEMBER – November monthly Activity Statements – due for lodgement and payment.

Where the due date falls on a weekend or public holiday, it is deferred until the next business day (except in the case of Superannuation Guarantee deadlines) 

SINGLE TOUCH PAYROLL

STP if fnally here! 
From 1 July 2018, all employers with 20 or more employees (as at 1 April 2018), must report their payroll information to the ATO via Single Touch Payroll. STP is a reporting change for employers. Essentially, STP requires that each time an employer pays their employees, they will have to instantly report to the ATO information such as the salaries and wages, pay as you go (PAYG) withholding and superannuation. The information will need to be reported from software, which is STP-enables. Eventually this will mean:

  • Employers will not need to provide Payment Summaries to their employees for the payments reporter through STP.
  • Employees will be able to view their payment information in ATO online services, which they will access through their myGov account.
  • Some labels on Activity Statements will be pre-filled with the information already reported.

NB employers with less than 20 employees (as at 1 April 2018) your STP start date will be 1 July 2019.

To finish reading this article – log into the Members Area and see your July/Aug Newsletter edition page 11

Not a member – SIGNUP NOW and have access to this and many other tax planning & tax saving articles https://mytaxsavers.com.au/plans/subscriptions/

AFTER TAX SUPPERANNUATION CONTRIBUTIONS

2017/2018 is the first year that individuals can reduce their tax liability for the year by making a pre-1 July personal superannuation contribution.  

To recap, new laws were introduced effective 1 July 2017 allowing all individuals up to age 75 to claim an income tax deduction for personal, after-tax superannuation contributions (pre-tax contributions, also known as salary sacrifice contributions, are deductible to your employer not you). Before this date, you could only claim a deduction for your personal contributions where less than 10% of (a) your assessable income (b) your reportable fringe benefits and (c) your reportable emaployer superannuation contributions (e.g. salary sacrifice contibutions) for the year were from being an employee – this was known as the “10% Rule”. This rule prevented most employees from claiming a tax deduction for their personal after-tax superannuation contributions.

To claim a deduction, the standard requirements that existed under the old rules must also be satisfied as follows: 
  • Age – All individuals under the age of 65 are eligible. Those aged 65 to 74 must meet the superannuation ‘work test’ (work for at least 40 hours in a period of not more that 30 consecutive days in the financial year in which you plan to make the contribution). For those aged 75, the contribution must be made no later than 28 days after the end of the month in which you turn 75 . Older tax payers are ineligible.
  • Minors – If the individual is under 18 at the end of the income year in which the contribution is made, they must derive income in that year from being an employee or carrying on a business.
  • Compying Fund – The contribution must be made to a complying superannuation fund.
  • Notice Requirements – To claim the deduction you must provide your superannuation fund with a Notice of intention to claim a deduction form before you lodge your tax return in respect of that financial year.
Note that the maximum deduction that you can claim is $25,000. This is the amount of the concessional contributions cap. As well as your after-tax contributions, included in the $25,000 cap are:
  • Employer contributions (including the compulsory 9.5% Superannuation Guarantee (SG) and salary sacrifice), and
  • Certain amounts transferred from a foreign superannuation fund to an Australian superannuation fund (this won’t affect most taxpayers).
Fo example, if you earned $50,000 for the year from your job, and your employer contributed $4,750, then in effect the maximum amount you could contribute and claim as a deduction would be $20,250 ($25,000 cap, minus $4,750).

https://www.ato.gov.au/forms/notice-of-intent-to-claim-or-vary-a-deduction-for-personal-super-contributions/