Tag: Superannuation Changes

AFTER TAX SUPPERANNUATION CONTRIBUTIONS

2017/2018 is the first year that individuals can reduce their tax liability for the year by making a pre-1 July personal superannuation contribution.  

To recap, new laws were introduced effective 1 July 2017 allowing all individuals up to age 75 to claim an income tax deduction for personal, after-tax superannuation contributions (pre-tax contributions, also known as salary sacrifice contributions, are deductible to your employer not you). Before this date, you could only claim a deduction for your personal contributions where less than 10% of (a) your assessable income (b) your reportable fringe benefits and (c) your reportable emaployer superannuation contributions (e.g. salary sacrifice contibutions) for the year were from being an employee – this was known as the “10% Rule”. This rule prevented most employees from claiming a tax deduction for their personal after-tax superannuation contributions.

To claim a deduction, the standard requirements that existed under the old rules must also be satisfied as follows: 
  • Age – All individuals under the age of 65 are eligible. Those aged 65 to 74 must meet the superannuation ‘work test’ (work for at least 40 hours in a period of not more that 30 consecutive days in the financial year in which you plan to make the contribution). For those aged 75, the contribution must be made no later than 28 days after the end of the month in which you turn 75 . Older tax payers are ineligible.
  • Minors – If the individual is under 18 at the end of the income year in which the contribution is made, they must derive income in that year from being an employee or carrying on a business.
  • Compying Fund – The contribution must be made to a complying superannuation fund.
  • Notice Requirements – To claim the deduction you must provide your superannuation fund with a Notice of intention to claim a deduction form before you lodge your tax return in respect of that financial year.
Note that the maximum deduction that you can claim is $25,000. This is the amount of the concessional contributions cap. As well as your after-tax contributions, included in the $25,000 cap are:
  • Employer contributions (including the compulsory 9.5% Superannuation Guarantee (SG) and salary sacrifice), and
  • Certain amounts transferred from a foreign superannuation fund to an Australian superannuation fund (this won’t affect most taxpayers).
Fo example, if you earned $50,000 for the year from your job, and your employer contributed $4,750, then in effect the maximum amount you could contribute and claim as a deduction would be $20,250 ($25,000 cap, minus $4,750).

https://www.ato.gov.au/forms/notice-of-intent-to-claim-or-vary-a-deduction-for-personal-super-contributions/

New Year Issues and Strategies

The New Year is a time to reflect, but also look ahead. Following are some of the issues business owners and individuals may turn their minds to as we enter 2017.

STAFFING LEVELS
Employing – If you determine you need additional staff – perhaps you are adding additional services/product lines to your business; you have a shortfall in the number of staff required to undertake current work in your business; or are replacing staff who have left your business – there is a myriad of obligations and procedures to be followed, both at a State and Federal level. To assist employers, the Government in conjunction with small business owners, Tax Agents, and industry associations, has created a Taking on Employees Checklist www.business.gov.au/info/run/employ-people. Irrespective of which State or Territory you are located, this comprehensive checklist covers off on all the Federal and State laws that apply when taking on a new employee – from pay entitlements, superannuation, insurance, withholding tax, and more. It’s a one-stop shop.
Redundancy – On the other hand, if your year-end review of staffing levels determines that there is excess staff, an employee may be made redundant. From a taxation perspective, a redundancy occurs when the employee is dismissed because the job they are doing no longer exists in your business – it has become redundant, and nobody is required to perform that specific role. Where this is the case, the employee is afforded concessional tax treatment on payments such as: payments in lieu of notice, severance payments of a number of weeks’ pay for each year of service, and gratuities or golden handshakes. Any payments that meet the conditions of a genuine redundancy are tax-free up to a limit based on the employee’s years of service with you. The tax-free limit is a flat dollar amount ($9,936 for 2016/2017), plus an amount for each year of completed service ($4,969) with the employer. Indexation changes the tax-free limit on 1 July each year. Note that for this concessional tax treatment to apply, the employee must be less that 65 years of age a the time the redundancy payment is made.
The following payments are not included in a genuine redundancy payment – salary/wages/allowances owing for work already done or leave already taken for work completed; lump sum payments of unused annual leave or leave loading paid on termination of employment; lump sum payments of unused long service leave paid on termination of employment under a financial arrangement; or payments made in lieu of superannuation benefits.

SUPERANNUATION CHANGES
Upcoming superannuation changes will impact many thousands of Australians in 2017, and may require some forward planning on your part. The changes which have now been passed by Parliament are:
  • From 1 July 2017, only those with a superannuation account balance below $1.6 million will be able to make non concessional contributions
  • If you are eligible to make no-concessional contributions from 1 July 2017 (i.e. have an account balance below $1.6 million) you will be limited to $100,000 per annum (or $300,000 over three years using existing bring-forward rules). Up until this date, the cap remains at $180,000 or $540,000 over 3 years. Thus over the coming months taxpayers, who are contemplating making large non-concessional contributions may wish to consider bringing forward those contributions to before 1 July. If making a large contribution (e.g. you may have received an inheritance, or sold a property) this will enable you to deposit more money into the concessionally  taxed superannuation environment sooner, and enjoy those tax concessions from an earlier date.
  • Concessional contributions limit will from 1 July 2017 be reduced to $25,000 for all taxpayers. Currently, the limit is $30,000 (or $35,000 for taxpayers aged over 49)
  • Allowing all individuals eligible to contribute to superannuation a deduction for their personal contributions up to the concessional contributions limit, from 1 July 2017.
  • Taxing the earnings in respect of Transition to Retirement Income Streams (TRIS) at 15% (up from 0%) from 1 July 2017.
  • Reducing the income threshold at which taxpayers are charged an extra 15% tax on the concessional contributions from $3000,000 to $250,000 from 1  July 2017. 
INSTANT ASSET WRITE-OFF
With a sunset date of 30 June 2017, small businesses may wish to start considering bringing forward any planned asset investments to the next few months – particularity in this current low interest-rate environment. Up until 30 June 2017, Small Business Entities (SBE’s) can claim an immediate write-off for the acquisition of most depreciating assets used in their business if the asset cost less that $20,000.

PENSION AND ALLOWANCES CHANGES
On 1 January 2017, new rules for pension access will be applied. It is estimated more than 300,000 Australian will have their benefits reduced as a result Some forward planning may be required to replace any lost income. To be clear, these changes will affect all pensioners who are assets tested, or who are currently income tested but become asset tested including recipients of the Age Pension, Carer Payment, Disability Support Pension, Widow B Pension, and Wife Pension. The Asset Test Free Area is the amount of assets above which allowances are not paid and pensions are reduced. From 1 January 2017, the Full Pension Thresholds will increase. Only if your assets are below the thresholds will you be eligible for a full pension under 2017 assets test.

For the complete article, including case studies, please see your Jan/Feb 2017 ATR BiMonthly Update magazine, or log into your exclusive Members Area to read this article online. www.mytaxsavers.com.au/login