The Tax Advantages of Superannuation


Superannuation is a concessionally taxed environment as follows  

* Superannuation earnings (such as interest, dividends, rent etc.) are taxed at 15% when your account is in accumulation mode (i.e. not in pension mode). These earnings are tax-free when your account is in pension mode. By contrast, investment earnings on assets (such as shares, property, term deposits etc.) held outside of superannuation are taxed at your marginal tax

* Capital gains made by superannuation funds are likewise taxed at 15% when your account is in accumulation mode. Where a CGT assets supports a pension, any capital gain made when those assets are sold is tax-free. Any capital gain made by your superannuation fund is reduced to 10% (a 33% discount) where that asset has been held for 12 months or more.  Although this is a lesser discount than the 50% discount available to trusts and individuals, this is negated by the base CGT superannuation taxation rate of 15%.

Therefore, as well as making provision for your retirement, by contributing to superannuation you can also enjoy the above tax concessions. From 1 July 2017 all individuals up to age 75 can claim an income tax deduction for personal superannuation contributions. Before this date, you could only claim a deduction for your personal contributions where less than 10% of your assessable income, your reportable fringe benefits and your reportable employer superannuation contributions (e.g. salary sacrifice contributions) for the year were from being an employee – this was known as the 10% Rule. This rule prevented most employees from claiming a tax deduction for this type of contribution. However, under the new rules, to claim a deduction, the following requirements must be met:

* Age – All individuals under the age of 65 are eligible. Those aged 65 to 74 meet the superannuation ‘work test’ (work for at least 40 hours in a period of not more than 30 consecutive days in the financial year in which you plan to make the contribution). For those aged 75, the contribution must be made no later than 28 days after the end of the month in which you turn 75. Older taxpayers are ineligible.

* Minors –  If the individual is under 18 at the end of the income year in which the contribution is made, they must derive income in that year from being an employee or carrying on a business.

* Complying Fund – The contribution must be made to a complying superannuation fund.

* Notice Requirements – To claim the deduction you must provide your superannuation fund with a Notice of intention to claim a deduction form before you lodge your tax return in respect of that financial year.

Superannuation is also a great asset protection strategy. If a person becomes bankrupt, they may lose most (or all) of their assets. However, the Bankruptcy Act provides that the interest of the bankrupt in a regulated superannuation fund at the time of the commencement of the bankruptcy is not ‘property’ that can vest in their trustee in bankruptcy to be divided among creditors. Furthermore, if the superannuation fund pays a lump sum to a bankrupt (though not a pension) after the date of the bankruptcy, this money is also not divisible among creditors.